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The Vicar of Wrexell Frances Trollope

The Vicar of Wrexell

Frances Trollope

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Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free. This is an OCR edition with typos. Excerpt from book: as soon as it is sown. But by-and-by you shall transplant some ofMorePurchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free. This is an OCR edition with typos. Excerpt from book: as soon as it is sown. But by-and-by you shall transplant some of iny notions, Helen, into the fine natural soil of your brain- and tlicit, if they flourish, we filial see what they are really worth. For all reply, the pale Helen shook her head, as one who knows not well what has been said to him-. and the conversation languished and dropped, as every other had done since the blow had fallen which had, levelled her young and joyous spirit to the dust. CHAPTER IV. THE WILL. The day which saw the honoured remains of Mr. Mowbray committed to the tomb was one of dreadful suffering to his family, and to none more than to hia son, who with a heart swelling with the most genuine grief, was obliged to assume the garb of ceremony, and do the now gloomy honours of the mansion to many of the same friends and neighbours who had so recently received the joyous greeting of his father. Most thankful was he for the relief which followed the departure of the last of those who came to do honour to these splendid obsequies- and most soothing was it to his wounded and weary spirits to find himself once more surrounded only by those who could read in a look all he wished to express, and who required no welcome to share in the sorrow of that bitter day. Uut, like all other periods of human life, whether marked by sorrow or by joy, it passed away with as even and justly- niL-asured a pace as if no event distinguished it from its fellow days- and then, by slow but sure degrees, the little trifling ordinary routine of daily circumstance came with its invisible and unnoticed magic, to efface, or at least to weaken, feelings which seemed to have been impressed by the stamp of burning iron on their souls. Charles Mowbray had not yet taken his degree, and wishingto do Bo as soon as possi...