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Border Forays and Adventures Lyman Copeland Draper

Border Forays and Adventures

Lyman Copeland Draper

Published September 14th 2006
ISBN : 9781933912462
Hardcover
442 pages
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 About the Book 

Border Forays and Adventures contains some of the most gripping tales leading up to the independence of the American colonies from the tyrannical rule of the British Empire. Many of the stories, including Indian tortures and the burning of WilliamMoreBorder Forays and Adventures contains some of the most gripping tales leading up to the independence of the American colonies from the tyrannical rule of the British Empire. Many of the stories, including Indian tortures and the burning of William Crawford a the stake, are horrible to read, but it is Americas heritage. There are terrible mistakes made. The cover of the book carries a picture of Miss Jane McCrea, who was on her way to marry Lieutenant David Jones of the British army, when she was shot off a horse and scalped by Indians paid by Lt. General John Burgoyne, the general who led the British army. There is a story of Christian Indians being clubbed to death by American troops caused by a slip of the tongue. And yet there are victories. Four chapters devoted to an American victory over Indians on October 10, 1774 at the Battle of Point Pleasant, often referred to as Lord Dunmores War, although Dunmore and his troops were not involved in the battle. One chapter in Border Forays is dedicated to George Rogers Clarks conquest of the Illinois. From that chapter the following language may be found: Soldiers! We are near the enemy who have so long annoyed us, and whom we have been four years endeavoring to reach and punish. We are not fighting alone for liberty and independence but for the defense of our own frontiers from the tomahawk and scalping-knife of the Indians. We are virtually defending the lives of our women and children, although a long distance from them. These British garrisons furnish the Indians with powder and lead to desolate the frontiers and they pay gold for human scalps. We must take and destroy these garrisons. The fort before us is one of them, and it mustbe taken. We cannot retreat. We have no provisions, and must conquer or starve. This is the Fourth of July. We must act to honor it. Let it not be said, in after times, that Virginians were defeated on that memorable day. The fort and town, I repeat, must be taken at all hazards. Those words, spoken over two hundred and twenty-five years ago, tell the story of this book - the price that our ancestors, man, woman, and child paid for our American independence - Your Heritage, My Heritage. That speech to his troops, given on our National Holiday, however, only touches the surface of the horror suffered in gaining that independence. From the files of a man who corresponded with relatives of participants and who wrote of those early days in American history, this book is written. Much is not pleasant to read, but only reinforces what George Rogers Clark said and meant. His troops conquered and they honored that memorable day - the Fourth of July.